10 Military Field Jackets to Sport on the Streets

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The field jacket has a long-standing pedigree in military history. With many iterations over the years, none remains more iconic than the M-65, a style first introduced by Alpha Industries to outfit soldiers during the Vietnam War. With four front pockets — two on the hips, two on the chest — to carry excess cargo, the M-65 integrated a roll-up hoodie that fit into a zipped pouch around the collar, along with a hardy brass zipper in place of buttons for efficiency.

Though Alpha Industries hasn’t produced an M-65 for combat since the ’90s, the field jacket endures as a study in simplicity, utility and comfort. Today it’s worn casually by men and women alike, and treasured for its utilitarian design and nondescript aesthetic. Here are a number of versatile field jackets in different fabrics, from waxed cotton to canvas, that build upon the original.

Jackets:
Bonobos Lightweight Military Jacket ($228)
Barbour Sapper Jacket ($429)
Alpha Industries M-65 Field Coat ($180)
Apolis Linen Field Jacket ($288)
Orvis Woodside Meadow Jacket ($298)
Vince Military 3-in-1 Waxed Cotton Jacket ($487)
The Real McCoy’s M-65 Field Jacket (~$541)
Saint Laurent Cotton and Linen-Blend Field Jacket ($1,850)
Gubb & Mackie Raleigh Squad (~$296)
Private White V.C. ($570)

BADOIT BULLES DE JOIE [VIDEO]

Badoit – Bulles de joie depuis 1778 ! (Badoit – Bubbles joy since 1778!)

A new film which features a merry chase whose object of desire is the Badoit … A crazy adventure through a labyrinth of time, making us go through different periods 2015 until 1778.

Want to know more about Badoit?

FYI: The site is in French.

7 Steps to Planning Your Next Digital Detox

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Photo by Flickr user Silvia Sala

Digital detox: A period of time during which a person refrains from using electronic devices such as smartphones or computers, regarded as an opportunity to reduce stress or focus on social interaction in the physical world.

Disconnect to connect. Unplug. Digital detox. These terms are all the rage at the moment, representing the act of stepping away from our adored electronics and reconnecting to the world around us. Even unlikely players like communications companies and app developers are getting on board. Here at Goodnet, we highly recommend taking a break – in whatever form works for you – and have broken the process down into seven easy steps for you to put into action. Good luck!

1. GET INSPIRED

Before you begin planning, get excited! A plethora of awesome publications across the web are getting down with the digital detox – from the this infographic guide to this detailed account of one man’s 25-day hiatus from the WWW. YouTube is also a good resource to scour for creative inspiration – check out this great clip for starters.

TIP: Rather than printing out articles you’d like to read later, use an e-reader such as Pocket or Readability to enjoy them when and where it’s convenient for you.

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Photo by Flickr user » Zitona «

2. SET YOUR TIMER

The first step towards a successful digital detox is choosing a feasible length of time – and sticking to it. Try to find the balance between being realistic and challenging yourself – for example, taking a month off email is unlikely to work if you need to hold down a job, while turning your phone off from midnight until 7am on the weekend probably won’t make much of a difference to your life.

TIP: If in doubt, try a weekend. It’s just long enough to really disconnect and unwind, but shouldn’t be too hard to execute.

Photo by Flickr user eflon

Photo by Flickr user eflon

3. IT’S ALL ABOUT BOUNDARIES

Take some time to think about your e-life, and what it will mean to turn it off. Do you plan to cut yourself off from all emails or just work emails? And what about television and social media?

TIP: For your first digital detox, we recommend cutting out anything that involves a glowing screen or the Internet. In other words: computer, iPad and smartphone – out; Kindle – in.

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Photo by Flickr user adactio

4. SCHEDULE SOME QUALITY TIME

One of the best things about taking a digital detox is that it gets your face away from the screen, and in front of the friendly faces of your friends and family. Schedule at least one meal with loved ones (here’s some quick, healthy meal ideas) and let everyone know that it’ll be an unplugged meal. You can even make a game out of it – stack everyone’s cell phones face down on the table. First person to check their phone takes everyone out for ice cream.

TIP: Think old school – pull out your board games from the back of the cupboard and get ready for some fun.

Photo by Flickr user WanderingtheWorld (www.LostManProject.com)

Photo by Flickr user WanderingtheWorld (www.LostManProject.com)

5. GET OUT

Spending some time outdoors – whether it’s a picnic, a jog or a day at the beach – is a non-negotiable part of your digital detox. Not only does sunshine stimulate the essential nutrient Vitamin D, getting down with nature will make you calmer, happier and more focused. Better still, plan a mini-break and get out of town.

TIP: If you need to research your outdoor adventure, make sure you do it before your detox starts to avoid contaminating your chill out time staring at a screen.

Photo by Flickr user marcp_dmoz

Photo by Flickr user marcp_dmoz

6. READ BETWEEN THE LINES

In his much-quoted 2008 article in The Atlantic, “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”, which he later expanded into a full-length book, American writer Nicholas Carr expounds a theory that the Internet has “chipped away” at our “capacity for concentration and contemplation.” Use your digital detox to read something long and involved – all in one go. It could be a book, a magazine article you haven’t had time to read, or even a short story.

TIP: For best results, get stuck in a good novel. Reading fiction has been found to make you more empathetic.

Photo by Flickr user by Janine

Photo by Flickr user by Janine

7. LEARN FROM THE EXPERIENCE

When your allotted digital detox time is up, take a moment to ponder – rather than running straight to your iPhone to catch up on everything you missed on Facebook. Ask yourself these three simple questions before diving back into the digital world:

1.  What have you learned from the experience?

2.  Having lived without it this long, is there any device/platform you think you can do without permanently?

3.  Would you consider setting a regular time (say, Saturday afternoon to Sunday evening every week) to repeat the experience?

TIP: Write down some notes as you go through the questions so you can refer back for next time.

Photo by Flickr user Walt Stoneburner

Photo by Flickr user Walt Stoneburner